Part I

Women in Reiki book

This book is the first to focus on the women who practised in the early days of Reiki. Some are well known while others are yet to be discovered. Follow the stories of Chiyoko Yamaguchi, Hawayo Takata, Chie Hayashi, Kimiko Koyama and other women who used Reiki in their everyday lives and passed it down through the generations.

Learn about the lives they led, the society they were part of and the efforts they made to ensure Reiki survived. 

  • What were their life circumstances?

  • What challenges did they have to overcome?

  • And what can we learn from them today?

"Misu, Katsue’s grandmother, supported her grandchildren in giving Reiki. She would sometimes bring people to the house who she thought needed treatments and make tea for them while Katsue, and later Chiyoko, gave them Reiki. It wasn’t long before many local people who recognised how valuable Reiki was were asking to learn Reiki for themselves."

from the chapter on Katsue Komatsu

"For Chie, life was tough after her husband's death. To begin with she had to lie low to avoid suspicion from the authorities."

from the chapter on Chie Hayashi

"Reiki means to receive the light of love. If you cannot feel the divine in the middle of your heart (kokoro), you’ll be lost and won’t find your way. No matter how much times might change, love remains." (found in the teaching handbook of Kimiko Koyama, 6th President of Usui Reiki Ryoho Gakkai)

from the chapter on Kimiko Koyama

"Before Pearl Harbor, Hawayo had promoted Reiki officially

in the newspapers, with its Japanese name. She had used the Gokai scroll with the Five Principles while teaching and introduced her students to Gassho meditation. After the attack, she didn’t use these openly Japanese references any more."

from the chapter on Hawayo Takata
Quote on Women in Reiki

"It's such a great looking and well organized book! I see lots of detailed oriented care from the beginning to the end."  E.L.